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Kurikyu Bento Boxes

By Kurikyu Rakuten 

“Every angle is a weakness” says Kurikyu, the traditional craftsmen who produces Kurikyu Bento Boxes (¥10,500-11,025Prices are approximate only and subject to change.
White Rabbit Express service fee and other costs not included.
), made with carefully bent pieces of Akita Cedar. The wood is bent into a circular or oval shape using specialized tools and generations of knowledge and skill, creating a strong, durable lunch box.

Bento boxes are Japan’s traditional way of carrying your lunch with you. Food is placed into the small compartments, the wooden lid goes on top and it’s all tied up with a cloth. Food left in one of Kurikyu’s Bento Boxes will keep for up to 24 hours, due to the qualities of the cedar. This specific wood is especially suited for humid environments, like Japan’s.

When thinking about making each bento box, Kurikyu reminds himself, “do not take shortcuts, do not cheat, do not compromise.” He became the sixth generation bento box craftsman of his family when he was 18. In 2012 he was recognized by Japan’s Good Design Awards (Judged by the art-director of Muji) when they gave the Kurikyu Bento Boxes an award for design and craftsmanship.

They’re items which carry hundreds of years of skill and knowledge and if taken care of properly, will keep your lunches fresh for years, too. They come in three versions:

Specifications:

Type: k-202 lunch box
Size: W166xD97xH80mm
Cost: (¥11,025Prices are approximate only and subject to change.
White Rabbit Express service fee and other costs not included.
)

Type: k-204 Slim Oval lunch box
Size: W200xD110xH57mm
Cost: (¥10,500Prices are approximate only and subject to change.
White Rabbit Express service fee and other costs not included.
)

Type: k-128 Oval lunch box
Size: W200xD130xH42mm
Cost: (¥10,500Prices are approximate only and subject to change.
White Rabbit Express service fee and other costs not included.
)

Notes for cleaning:

1. Soaked the wood for about 10 minutes in hot water.
2. Wash and rub the inside and outside of the wood along with grain with a sponge.
3. Wipe with a dish towel. After you wipe off the excess moisture, you can leave it to dry.

Contributed by Cameron

Cameron is a writer and journalist in Tokyo. He studied psychology and sociology before moving to Japan to explore its publishing, design and art. While living in Japan he has spent his time travelling to rural towns to document traditional Japanese crafts and covering the work of contemporary artists and designers in Tokyo. He is White Rabbit's expert on traditional objects, handcrafted goods and contemporary art.

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